My lingonberry smoothie

I used to have major problems eating breakfast. I’m one of those people whose natural sleeping cycle involves staying up until 1am and waking up around 9-10am.

So when the society wants me to be at school or in the office at 9am, you can imagine the struggles I have had. One of the shortcuts to get started on time was to skip breakfast. And it worked fine for a while!

Then I realized that I’d rather enjoy my life than optimize everything down to the last minute. So now I have become a breakfast smoothie addict. I use lots of berries that are from Finnish nature. Lingonberry has been a little problematic berry for me, but I finally found a smoothie combo with it that I actually enjoy having!

Lingonberry smoothie à la Annu

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2 cups of Almond milk
1 teaspoon of Almond butter
1 tablespoon of Almonds
1 cup of Lingonberries
1 tablespoon of Flaxmeal
1 tablespoon of Dried goji berries
Dash of raw vanilla powder
Natural honey (high on nutrients)
+ Pollen (to help me with my allergies)

Please not that the amounts are not exact. I never measure the ingredients myself, instead I use my gut feeling to make the smoothie a little bit different every time.

How to make: put the ingredients to the blender and let the blending magic happen. It’s as simple as that! The amount of honey you use is critical to the sweetness of the smoothie (to balance out the strong sting of lingonberries) so use it according to your own taste.

This smoothie really starts my day though lingonberry might be quite strong to begin with. What do you think? Is lingonberry a good ingredient to use in a smoothie?

Annu

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Oh crab! A Finnish crayfish party

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Every year when the summer turns into August and September starts creeping in, Finnish culinarists look into our thousands of lakes for something hard and delicious. Rumours of suspiciously noisy dinner parties start spreading like viruses and half of the population blames the Finnish Swedes for bringing too much happiness into the darkening evenings.

Blaming the Swedish for such a tradition actually has some accuracy. The story has that the Swedish are the ones to spread crayfish party tradition around the Scandinavian and Baltic countries. To this day, the tradition lives strong among the Swedish speaking population in Finland and an increasing number of the rest have also started “doing it”. Well, it is after all one delicious tradition!

Once you get the taste of it…

…the crayfish party becomes something you simply HAVE TO HAVE every year. I can take pleasure in knowing that I’m not the only one consumed by this obsession.

The concept of the party is simple and genius. The crayfish party is basically about… well, eating the crayfish. However, the tradition is greatly affected by the raw alcohol shots included in the dining experience. Messy eating and happy drinking combined with warm August nights and the best possible company of friends and family – could it get any better? It’s basically Christmas time for adults! We get to be messy and sing special songs too. There’s nothing to dislike!

Messy eating and happy drinking combined with warm August nights and the best possible company of friends and family – could it get any better?

This year it was yet another great experience

So this year we planned our own crayfish party with a small party of friends. Last weekend we left the city light behind us and drove into a summer cottage by the lake somewhere in the middle of Finland. Saturday was our chosen day for some major crayfish enjoyment. It was the very same day the “Kiira” storm hit Southern Finland. We chose to embrace the possibility to eat inside the small candle lit wooden cabin, while the big thunderstorm would rage outside our windows.

We had it all planned and ready to go:

  • we had the crayfish prepared
  • we had the booze smoking cold (Koskenkorva)
  • we had replaced the forgotten crayfish knives with the ones we found in the cottage
  • we had last minute bought the much needed shot glasses for the booze (something we also forgot to take with us)
  • we had loads of bread to eat the crayfish with (too much bread)
  • we had replaced the missing butter with selfmade garlic oil (which btw tasted fantastic)
  • and most importantly: we had theme related setting and deco

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Boy, were we ready for the big thunderstorm and the romantic atmosphere it would create for the party! The rumbling closed in and it was loud. It started raining. And then that was all of it! The storm circled right past us, never giving us more than distant murmuring and some gentle rain. What a disappointment. So we had the party with rain conforming us with its soothing sounds.

When you combine Finnish people with alcohol after midnight, there’s a good chance that they start digging deep. They will start philosophical, earth shattering, honest conversations about life. Sitting next to a living fire exponentially increases the chances of this happening.

When you combine Finnish people with alcohol after midnight, there’s a good chance that they start digging deep.

We ladies took our fruit in a basket and walked through the dark forest to start an open fire to make some dessert. What happened was exactly was could be expected: we talked long into the night about life, relationships, fear and dreams. It was sun that made us realize that the night had passed in deep conversation. There are few joys in life that are equal to first pouring your heart out to someone and going to bed with the sunrise. Overall, one might argue that the crayfish party was an overall success this year!

With friends and traditions like these – who needs therapists?

-Annu

7 reasons why I love living in Finland

I realized a while ago that on a global scale my life here in Finland is not an ordinary one. I used to hate Finland and the Finnish way of living, but travelling and maturing past teenage years appear to have given me another perspective. I have learned that many of the things I used to take for granted are not so outside my culture.

I have here listed seven things I feel extremely grateful for:

  1. I have enjoyed free comprehensive education and have an international higher  degree (for which I never paid a cent). Finnish education is one of the best ones in the world in case you did not already know that. And yeah, it’s free for us.
  2. There is no one in my family, work colleagues or friends to define me by my relationships status. I may be single or I may be married, but my value as a human being does not depend on it.
  3. I can provide for myself. I have a job that I love (in an IT company) and my slightly obese pay is equal or even better to the men around me. I decide 100% what I do with my money and anything else would be seen as weird or even illegal.
  4. I have had several health problems during my life. Finnish public health insurance even though not perfect, has enabled me to get health care without worrying about money in order to get treatment.
  5. As a sensitive and introverted person, I love that in Finland being loud or getting physically too close are both considered rude. Permission to touch another person generally requires established trust. And for f**k’s sake if you grab my ass without consent, you will be publicly ashamed or getting a swing at your own groin. Sexual harrashment has no place here.
  6. Honesty is an exceptionally high value here. The big number one on which everything else is built on. You can see its influence everywhere. I should probably write a separate blog post about this. 😀
  7. Nature nature nature! We have such pure nature and the Finnish lifestyle with summer cottages and mushroom picking is simply the best therapy for anyone! Food is natural and quite free of toxins. Try natural blueberries from the forest:

How do you like this list? Is this something you can relate to yourself?

Since I´m new with blogging, I´d really appreciate your feedback! If you come up with anything you´d like to ask or comment on or have some great tips for me – please let me know!

It´s quite a journey that I have started… and I´m so excited!

-Annu